Different and Incompatible Ways of Selling

Most salespeople try to get people to buy from them.  If this is the way you want to sell, then your success will depend upon how good you are at persuading and convincing, or at least influencing people.  You give them reasons to buy.  You focus on their needs and problems and expose vulnerabilities.  You use techniques to build rapport and make them like you and trust you.  If a sale doesn’t occur, it’s because you failed.  Perhaps you weren’t persuasive enough or friendly enough.

In High Probability Selling, we look for and work with people who want what we are selling, and who are likely to buy from us very soon.  If this is the way you want to sell, then your success will depend upon how good you are at finding these people, and how good you are at assessing the probability that they will buy from you in the near future.  You let prospective customers make their own decisions, for their own reasons and in their own time.  You focus on what they want and when.  Then you focus on whether you want to do business with them or not.  If a sale doesn’t occur, it’s either because they didn’t want what you are selling right now, or because you have decided not to go ahead at this time.

Both strategies have their proponents, and both strategies have successful salespeople.  However, they are completely incompatible with each other.  You can’t pick and choose elements from each.  They just don’t mix.

Everything depends upon what you choose.  Just pick one or the other.

 

Different and Incompatible Ways of Selling

Upcoming Workshops as of August 2016

September 2016:  “Getting Personal” with High Probability Selling – Level 1.  $245 USD for 3 sessions spaced 1 week apart, plus exercises between sessions.  There are currently 3 choices for dates/times for this workshop (times are for USA Eastern Time Zone).  I will go with the one that is most popular:

  • Tuesdays:  13, 20, and 27 September.  10am to 5pm
  • Wednesdays:  14, 21, and 28 September.  3pm to 6pm
  • Thursdays:  15, 22, and 29 September.  10am to 5pm

October 2016:  Chapter 12 Explained.  $45 USD for 1 session.  The calendar is mostly open for this workshop.  I will choose a date and time based on the feedback I receive.

 

Sending Feedback About Scheduling

If you want to participate in either of these workshops, please tell me what dates and times work for you and what dates and times do not (and please mention your time zone).  I will use your feedback in selecting the exact schedule for each of these workshops.

You can send an email to info [at] HighProbSell [dot com] or you can leave a comment on this blog (but keep in mind that comments are visible to the public).

For more information about these workshops, please visit the HPS training webpage at www.HighProbSell.com/workshops

 

Upcoming Workshops as of August 2016

Chapter 12 Explained, Scheduled for Thu 18 Aug 2016

The teleseminar workshop on Chapter 12 of the book, High Probability Selling by Jacques Werth and Nicholas Ruben is now on the calendar, and is available for purchase now.

Date:   Thursday 18 August 2016
Time:   3:30pm to 4:30pm Eastern Time USA (same as New York City).
Where: Telephone (teleconference instructions will be sent to participants)
What:   A review and explanation of the last chapter, “A Complete High Probability Sale”
Led by: Carl Ingalls, +1 610-627-9030, Info@HighProbSell.com
Price:  $45 USD per person for full participation, or $35 USD per person to get the recording only.  Do Not Send Credit Card Info by Email

This teleseminar workshop is a review of the last chapter of the book, High Probability Selling by Jacques Werth and Nicholas Ruben.  Chapter 12 shows what “A Complete High Probability Sale” looks like, with all of the steps put together, but there are no explanations in that chapter about what is happening.  Each step is explained here.

The workshop is one session, one hour long (possibly longer), and led by Carl Ingalls.  It is live and interactive, with answers to participant’s questions.  Make sure you have a copy of the book with you, so you can follow the discussion.  An audio recording of the session will be sent to each participant.

To read more or to purchase, please visit HPS Training on our main website.

Chapter 12 Explained, Scheduled for Thu 18 Aug 2016

Upcoming Workshops as of June 2016

Here is a list of workshops we are planning.  The first three are ready to go now.  We will schedule them according to the feedback we receive from our audience.  You may vote in the poll at the bottom of this post, or you may call +1 610-627-9030 (ask for Carl Ingalls) or you may email info@HighProbSell.com

Explaining Chapter 12:  A Complete High Probability Sale
Description and explanation of the sales process that is shown in the last chapter of the book, High Probability Selling.  One session, 60 minutes.  Live and interactive teleseminar with Q & A.  The session is recorded, and the recording is sent to each participant.  Price is $45 per person.
Now scheduled for Thu 18 August 2016 at 3:30pm Eastern Time USA.  See HPS Training for details.

Getting Personal with High Probability Selling – Career
This is the beginning workshop on how we get to know people, and how we find out if we want to do business with someone or not.  How to ask questions and how to listen and respond to answers.  The things we do that make people reluctant to reveal themselves, and how to avoid doing them.  This workshop teaches students how to start a conversation with a stranger and learn about their career choices (what they chose and why).  This is the least emotional of the three levels of Getting Personal.  This beginning workshop is three sessions, 60 to 90 minutes each, spaced one week apart.  Live and interactive teleseminars with exercises assigned to do between sessions.  All sessions are recorded, and the recordings are sent to each participant.  This is the same workshop as what was previously titled Connecting with High Probability (see HPS Training).  Price is $245 per person.

Getting Personal with High Probability Selling – Relationships
This is the intermediate workshop on how we get to know people.  The methods and the objectives are the same as in the beginning workshop (Career).  This workshop teaches students how to ask questions that lead further back in time, and reveal how the other person deals with relationships.  Four sessions, 60 to 90 minutes each, spaced one week apart.  Live and interactive teleseminars with exercises assigned to do between sessions.  All sessions are recorded, and the recordings are sent to each participant.  The material in this workshop was previously included in the Selling Workshop (see HPS Training).  Price is $350 per person.

Getting Personal with High Probability Selling – Trauma
This is the advanced workshop on how we get to know people.  This is the most emotional of the three levels of Getting Personal.  We have been teaching it in semi-private coaching sessions.  If enough people say they want this as a group workshop, we will work out the details and offer it.

Upcoming Workshops as of June 2016

You Have to Get Personal

That’s what many of the top performing salespeople told Jacques Werth when he observed them asking very personal questions of their prospective customers.

“You have to get personal.”

Why?  “You need to see what makes them tick before you decide whether to do business with them or not.”

Jacques took careful notes on what these salespeople did when they “got personal” with their prospects, and he incorporated it into his sales process.

It’s an interview method, a way of asking personal questions.  A brief overview:

  1. Start by asking a simple question about something in the present, the here and now.
  2. Then, ask questions that go back in time, about the prospect’s past.
  3. Finally, ask questions to bring the prospect back to the present.

A few guidelines:

  • Ask questions that control the direction in time.  Start with the present, then move backward through time, then go back to the present.
  • Each question should be about something the prospect said when they first started answering your most recent question, and especially when going back in time.
  • Questions should give the other person as much latitude as possible in what they choose to say about their self.  What, How, When, Where, Who, Why.  No yes/no questions.  Nothing that steers them toward any particular answer.
  • Ask short and simple questions.  Be direct.
  • Keep all of your reactions neutral.  Nothing positive, nothing negative.  Keep calm and relaxed.
  • No comments, no opinions.  No “relating” to the prospect.
  • Listen and pay attention.

This is a discovery process, part of finding out whether we want to do business with someone, or not.  We are not trying to build a relationship, or get anyone to buy, or get someone to trust or like us.

It appears in the book, High Probability Selling, Chapters 7 and 12.  It has been called the “Relationship Inquiry” or the “Trust and Respect Inquiry” (abbreviated TRI).  We have taught it in our sales training workshops.

“Getting Personal” is a descriptive name for this process.  This name is about what we do, and not about a desired outcome (like establishing a relationship or building trust).

The Getting Personal process may be the most valuable part of High Probability Selling.  People who become proficient often talk about how it has changed their lives, in selling and everywhere else.

However, it is not for everyone.  It seems so strange and unconventional, and contrary to social conventions.  Many people feel so uncomfortable with this, that they are unable to follow the process well enough to get any benefit from it.

If you have questions about this, please put them in the comments for this blog post, so that other readers may see your questions and our answers.  If you prefer a private conversation, you are welcome to call or write.

You Have to Get Personal

How Can I Convince You That Convincing Doesn’t Work?

This is a question that I heard Jacques Werth ask many times, “How can I convince you that convincing doesn’t work?”

In a selling situation, Jacques knew that attempting to convince someone was not a good use of a salesperson’s time.  However, he was usually in a marketing situation when he asked that question, and he passionately wanted salespeople to become more successful.

Now that Jacques is retired, it’s my turn to ask, “How can I convince you that convincing doesn’t work?”

Here are some answers to think about:

  1. I could try to convince you by giving you logical arguments and reasons why you can’t convince someone.
    • Pros:  I’m very comfortable with creating and presenting logical arguments, and I’m good at it.  It works just often enough for me to keep trying.
    • Cons:  It hasn’t worked as well as I think it should.  Too many people resist being argued into a new belief.
  2. I could give you evidence of how other people have become more successful when they stopped trying to convince people.
    • Pros:  Some people can be influenced by evidence.  In this case, the evidence is available and doing this seems logical.
    • Cons:  Many people don’t trust evidence, because it is too often twisted and used to manipulate people’s beliefs.
  3. I could give up the idea of trying to convince you, and focus instead on finding someone who already believes that convincing doesn’t work.
    • Pros:  This is less stressful than trying to change someone’s mind, and can be a lot more effective (when done right).
    • Cons:  Working with people who already believe is tricky.  It is too easy to fall back to old habits, and turn them off by saying something persuasive.  Also, sometimes you don’t have the option of choosing who you are going to work with, and can’t just go find someone else.
  4. I could list some options for you to consider, providing my understanding of the pros and cons for each option, and without trying to steer you in any direction.  I could then ask you what you want to do.
    • Pros:  More people follow my advice when I present it objectively and don’t tell them what to do.
    • Cons:  Presenting advice this way is a lot more work.  It is frustrating to know that it would be so much quicker and easier if I just told you what to think.

What do you think?

How Can I Convince You That Convincing Doesn’t Work?

Pay Attention To What They Want

Most buyers prefer to do business with salespeople who pay attention to what they want.

Many salespeople want to sell by trying to get a potential customer to buy.  Their focus is on influencing the other person.  Not on what the person wants or doesn’t want.

A few salespeople want to sell without trying to get the other person to buy.  They would rather focus on people who want what they are selling, and skip all that persuading and convincing.

You can be successful using either method.

What really matters is how you want to sell.

 

Pay Attention To What They Want