Charisma vs Passion in Selling

Charisma is about charming people.  It is a way of influencing how someone feels about you.  It may be natural, or it may be a technique for getting approval.

Passion (in this context) is how we feel about something we do.  Feeling passion and expressing passion are two very different things.  The first is real, and the second may be an act.  If we are not careful, our expression of passion may be interpreted as an attempt to influence how a prospect feels about what we are selling.

Influencing how a prospect feels is one way to sell.  However, influencing a prospect is not compatible with High Probability Selling.

We teach our students to maintain an objective, neutral, and businesslike manner when selling.  We put our passion and our energy into finding people who want what we are selling and into determining how likely the outcome will turn out the way we want it to.


Upcoming HPS Workshops:
Getting Personal (17 Jan 2017, $245);  Chapter 12 Explained (26 Jan 2017, $45);  Prospecting (21 Feb 2017, $1050)

Charisma vs Passion in Selling

Upcoming Workshops in November and December 2016

Upcoming Workshops:

  • Chapter 12 Explained (15 Nov and 13 Dec 2016, $45)
  • Getting Personal with High Probability Selling – Beginners (6 Dec 2016, $245)

Chapter 12 Explained.  This is an entry level course (group workshop).  It’s an overview of all of the steps in the entire High Probability Selling process, with answers to participant’s questions.

The price is $45 USD per person.  This covers 1 session, 60 to 90 minutes long, plus a recording of the session.  Conducted by telephone (teleconference, interactive), with questions and answers.  Led by Carl Ingalls.

Calendar.  Schedule may change.  Times are USA Eastern Time (same as New York City).

  • November 2016 – Tuesday 15 at 3pm
  • December 2016 – Tuesday 13 at 3pm

For more details, or to purchase, please see www.HighProbSell.com/workshops/chapt12/

To listen to a sample of the 18 Aug 2016 recording of this workshop, please click here.  The full recording is available for purchase for $29 USD.


Getting Personal with High Probability Selling – Level 1.  This is an entry level course (group workshop) on one part of High Probability Selling.

The price is $245 USD per person.  This covers 3 sessions spaced 1 week apart, plus a recording of each session (which are sent to participants only). Conducted by telephone (teleconference, interactive), with exercises to do between sessions.  Led by Carl Ingalls.

Calendar. The next Getting Personal workshop starts on Tuesday 6 December 2016, and continues with the two Tuesdays that follow (13 and 20 Dec).  The starting time for each session is 11am USA Eastern Time (same as New York City).  Duration of each session is 1 to 2 hours.

For more details, or to purchase, please see www.HighProbSell.com/workshops/tri1/


Other Workshops.  For information about other group workshops, and also about individual coaching, please visit the HPS training webpage at www.HighProbSell.com/workshops

Upcoming Workshops in November and December 2016

Upcoming Workshops as of October 2016

Getting Personal with High Probability Selling – Level 1.  This is an entry level course (group workshop) on one part of High Probability Selling.

The price is $245 USD per person.  This covers 3 sessions spaced 1 week apart, plus exercises between sessions, plus session recordings (which are sent to participants only). Conducted by telephone (teleconference, interactive).  Led by Carl Ingalls.

The first session begins Thu 13 Oct 2016 at 3:00pm (USA Eastern Daylight Time) and will last from 90 minutes to 2 hours.  The workshop will continue with 2 more sessions, Thu 20 Oct and Thu 27 Oct, same time. For more details, or to purchase, please see www.HighProbSell.com/workshops/tri1/

 

Chapter 12 Explained.  This is an entry level course (group workshop).  It’s an overview of all of the steps in the entire High Probability Selling process, with answers to participant’s questions.

The price is $45 USD per person.  This covers 1 session, plus a recording of the session.  Conducted by telephone (teleconference, interactive).  Led by Carl Ingalls.

The session begins Tue 18 Oct 2016 at 3:00pm (USA Eastern Daylight Time) and will last from 60 to 90 minutes.  For more details, or to purchase, please see www.HighProbSell.com/workshops/chapt12/

A recording of this workshop may be available separately for sale later.  The August workshop on the same subject is available for purchase for $35 USD.

 

Other Workshops.  For information about other group workshops, and also about individual coaching, please visit the HPS training webpage at www.HighProbSell.com/workshops

Upcoming Workshops as of October 2016

Questions from a Student of High Probability Selling (2016-09-03)

Adam sent me an email with questions about High Probability Selling after listening to the audio recording of the August 2016 teleseminar workshop on Chapter 12 Explained

Adam’s email appears here with his permission.  Answers from me (Carl Ingalls) are in red text (and indented).


From: Adam
Sent: Saturday, September 03, 2016 5:36 AM
To: Carl Ingalls
Subject: Re: Recording of Teleseminar Workshop “Chapter 12 Explained”

Hello Carl,

first, let me thank you for the seminar file; I listened to it twice and found it very informative and constructive… it was a nice surprise to hear Jacques’ voice as well!

Here are some of my questions/queries/digressions, etc directly and indirectly connected to the seminar:

1.while listening to Jacques recordings i couldn’t help noticing his art of talking in a very specific emotionless, almost monotonous way; do you know whether this is his natural way of talking or he developed it purposefully for business, if so how could one learn/train it?  (sometimes it is quite difficult to stay “cool” on the phone or during an appointment)

A:  Jacques’ art of talking in a neutral manner comes fairly natural to him, but he does not always talk that way.  He does that in situations where it is important to do so.  Examples:  when prospecting or selling (non-persuasively), or when communicating with someone who has lost their temper (see Jacques’ post on Angry People).  He probably improved on it while copying very successful salespeople and also while playing poker.  It can be taught, and it can be learned, but it takes a lot of effort.  We teach these skills continuously in our sales training workshops and coaching.

2.prospecting on the phone and the very opening; you advised to skip “hello”…hmm, business contacts in my country are quite formal and polite; skipping any kind of greetings/introduction would be considered rude…

A:  Many of the things we train salespeople to do seem impolite and rude, not only to Austrians, but to people everywhere.  Not saying “Hello” when prospecting is just one example.  There are others.  They have all been tested in many cultures around the world, with the same results.  We tried it both ways, and we get more sales when we stop saying “Hello” in our prospecting calls.  Many of us struggle with the conflict between doing what we feel comfortable about, and doing what gets us the results we want.

3.Trust & Respect Inquiry: in the book, Sal asks many questions while telling nothing about himself in return; i understand the purpose here, but can’t help thinking, this situation is out of balance; what if the client asks once or more “how about you?” at any time during this phase? should i tell him anything from my life or wriggle out, if so, how?

A:  Asking personal questions, while offering nothing of oneself in return, is very much “out of balance.”  This is especially true when compared to a typical personal conversation.  When we do it this way, people tell us things about themselves that they rarely get to say to other people.  Why?  We don’t know.  It probably has something to do with the way we give control of the topic to the other person, and the way we avoid judgments (including very subtle ones).

Occasionally, the other person will ask a question of us.  If it is a simple and direct question, we answer it as simply as we can, and then we ask our next question.  If their question  is vague and non-specific, like “how about you?” we would ask “What do you mean?” or something like that.

It is too easy to start talking about yourself during this process.  Don’t follow any suggestion or invitation to do so.  This is about the other person, not you.  You can talk about yourself later.

4.provided i have to break up the meeting during the COS discussion; how exactly do i do it? what do i say? do i keep an option for the future meeting? etc…

A:  It may depend on the reason for the interruption.  If you know that you want to proceed with the sale later, the best thing to do is to make very definite plans to continue the process.  Making an appointment is much better than “keeping an option” (which is too vague). 

i would be very grateful if you could give me your perspective…many thanks 🙂

best regards,

Adam


Comments and questions (and additional answers) from our readers are welcome.

Questions from a Student of High Probability Selling (2016-09-03)

Relationship Selling

Would you trust someone who tried to form a relationship with you solely for the purpose of selling you something?

Many salespeople believe that the key to getting someone to buy is to build a “relationship” first.  They are the ones who say “how are you” on a cold call.

Saying “how are you” on a cold call is one of the signs that someone is going to try to get you to buy.  You may have noticed that, consciously or unconsciously, and it may affect your decision about whether you will buy from that salesperson or not.

In High Probability Selling, we don’t try to build relationships.  Relationships come from doing business, not the other way around.

Relationship Selling

Next Sales Training Workshop, Connecting With High Probability, Starts Thu 24 July 2014

The next Sales Training Workshop on Connecting with High Probability starts on Thursday 24 July 2014, and ends on Thursday 7 August 2014 (note that the schedule has been changed).  Tuition is $245 per participant (US Dollars).

This workshop teaches participants one of the fundamentals of High Probability Selling (HPS), which is how we treat people and how we communicate with them.  We recommend this for people who are just beginning with HPS.

This workshop is a series of 3 sessions conducted by teleconference, and led by Jacques Werth.  Sessions will begin at 12:30 PM Eastern Time USA (same as New York City) on 3 consecutive Thursdays.  Most sessions take 90 minutes to 2 hours.  For more info about our time zone, please visit World Clock – Philadelphia.

Sessions are live and interactive, and exercises will be assigned between sessions.

To register for this workshop, you may do any of the following:

  • Call us at +1 610-566-1535, Monday to Friday, 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM Eastern Time USA.  Our toll free number is 800-394-7762
  • Email us (to Enroll@HighProbSell.com) with your name and phone number, and tell us when we can call you for additional info.  Please do not send credit card information by email.

Please note that we require each applicant to complete the following before participating in this workshop:

  • Read our Confidentiality Agreement and agree to its terms.  These terms are explained on our Confidentiality Agreement Webpage.
  • Complete the High Probability Benchmark Survey conducted by Pinnacle Group International (free, takes about 20 minutes).
  • Pay the tuition for the workshop, $245 per participant (US Dollars).

For more information, please visit our connecting workshop description page.

Next Sales Training Workshop, Connecting With High Probability, Starts Thu 24 July 2014

How to Say Ok Goodbye When a Prospect Says No

There are just three things to do when a prospect says “No”.  First you say “Ok” and then you say “Good-bye” and then you hang up.  However, the way you do each of these makes a lot of difference.  The meaning that the listener perceives is greatly influenced by your tone and timing.

The tone should be emotionally neutral, matter-of-fact, as if you were making a simple statement that has no “attitude”.  It should not convey your frustration about hearing “no” from yet another prospect.  It should not reveal your boredom with the process of making call after call.  It is also very important that your tone does not communicate an enthusiasm or friendliness that the prospect is likely to presume is faked.

The timing should clearly separate the “Ok” from the “Good-bye”.  Say these two words as two separate statements, with a pause in between.  Do not act like you are in a rush.  After you say “Good-bye” wait a while in silence before you hang up.  It’s best to let the other party hang up first.

Keep the intended meaning of each of these three things clearly in your mind when you do them.

  • Ok means that you acknowledge and accept what the prospect has just said.  It means that you are not going to argue.  It demonstrates that you did not have an emotional attachment to that particular outcome.  It demonstrates that you listen.
  • Good-bye means that you are done with this call.  It means that you have nothing more to say.  It demonstrates that you are moving on in a businesslike manner.
  • Waiting for a while before you hang up means that you are not dismissing the prospect.  You are not “slamming the door”.  It also gives the prospect an opportunity to ask you not to hang up yet.  This does happen, especially after you have called that prospect a few times.

To hear a sample of how to say “Ok … Good-bye”, you can click on this link

How to Say Ok Goodbye When a Prospect Says No